Choosing a Dog for Your Family – The Benefits of Different Breeds and Sizes

The addition of a dog to your family brings smiles and joy to your kid’s faces as they lay their eyes on their new furry friend for the first time. Choosing the right dog for your family is a bit more challenging than you’d like to think.

Some people make the mistake of thinking that large dogs are aggressive, while smaller dogs are ideal for a family pet. Unfortunately, it doesn’t work out this way. The temperament of your dog doesn’t relate to its size. For instance; Pomeranians are one of the smallest breeds, but they’re well-known for their lack of patience and snapping at young children.

Conversely, a large dog may strike fear into the hearts of people thinking about breaking into your home. However, breeds like the Cane Corso make fantastic family dogs that are very protective of children.

There’s plenty of dog breeds that get along well with kids. Here are a few tips for selecting your new family pet.

Selecting the Breed That’s Right for Your Family

Start your search for your canine friend on the internet. Visit the sites of the American Kennel Club, American Humane Society, and niche dog websites to get an idea of what breeds work well in different placements.

Your choice of breed must reflect the living environment, as well as your family’s requirements. Huskies are an example of beautiful dogs that require daily exercise. If your home has a small yard and you don’t get the opportunity to walk the dog regularly, a husky can become a nightmare to handle. These dogs need to run and become escape artists when they don’t get enough exercise.

In such a situation, a small dog like a pug or poodle makes for great family pets that suit smaller homes. If you have space, consider purchasing a larger breed. Labradors and retrievers are excellent examples of dogs with friendly temperaments that love to play.

Avoid advanced breeds like pit bulls and bull terriers. These kinds of dogs develop jealously quickly and seek to dominate other family members for your attention. This characteristic can lead to aggressive behavior and accidents are sure to follow.

Female or Male?

Deciding on a female or male dog is another crucial choice to make when selecting your new canine companion. Female dogs suit older children as they become more independent than males and are typically inconsistent with people. Male dogs are more affectionate but require more attention.

Females respond better to training in most cases, and they stay more focused than male dogs. However, male dogs retain their puppy-like characteristics and personality for longer than females. Certain breeds behave differently to others depending on their gender, so it’s best to check with the professionals before buying your dog.

Allergies and Dogs

Does anyone in your family have allergies? As a side note; dogs tend to have less allergenic properties than cats – but some breeds can set off allergic reactions in people sensitive to dog dander.

Dander is the combination of skin secretions, dry skin cells, and saliva seen on dog fur as dry white flakes. These flakes are what spark allergic reactions in humans – not the coat itself. Certain breeds with short hair may suffer from eczema. This skin condition exacerbates the occurrence of dander.

The American Kennel Club recommends the following breeds for their minimal dander production.

Bichon frise, Chinese crested, schnauzer, Bedlington terrier, and Maltese.

Wrapping Up – Consider a Rescue

Some people have to have a pure-breed dog, complete with authenticity papers. For those that don’t care about the lineage of their new pet, why not consider a rescue? Every day, owners abandon hundreds of unfortunate dogs.

Visiting your local animal shelter may yield surprising results – at a fraction of the cost of buying a pure-bred dog. Some kennels have dogs in excellent health that are in desperate need of a home. If someone doesn’t take them home, he or the shelter eventually put them to sleep. Think about a rescue. It could be the best friend your family ever has.