Find the Perfect Nail Clippers for Your Puppy or Adult Dog

Find the Perfect Dog Nail Clippers for Your Pup

Trimming your dog’s nails is an important aspect of grooming. While this may be something you prefer to have your vet do, it’s also something you can learn to do on your own, and with the right tools, it’s much simpler!

To find the best nail clippers for your pup, first determine if they are small, medium, or large based on DogGear standards:

Our nail clipper picks for small dogs are first, while the options for medium and large dogs are further down the page. You can also try the nail clipper quiz to get a recommendation that is more personalized for your pup based on our time spent researching all sorts of nail clippers!

Take the Dog Nail Clippers Quiz

To find the best dog nail clippers, select to begin by breed or by size

Nail Clippers for Small Dogs

Our top picks by your dog’s needs

The Scoop

Pros and cons

*The DogGear team did not stop with small dog nail clippers, we moved on and analyzed the options for medium dogs as well. Read on to gain knowledge and save time.

Nail Clippers for Medium Dogs

Our top picks by your dog’s needs

The Scoop

Pros and cons

*Last, and certainly not least, the DogGear team did not forget about large dog nail clippers. Keep diving in to our research, woof.

Nail Clippers for Large Dogs

Our top picks by your dog’s needs

The Scoop

Pros and cons

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DogGear Philosophy

While the sound of your pup’s nails running across the floor might sound cute, in reality, it’s a sign that his nails are in desperate need of a clipping. When a dog’s nails are so long that you can actually hear them clicking as he walks, he could be in pain and could even sustain injuries.

How to Find the Perfect Nail Clippers For Your dog

Learn more below about how to find the best nail clippers

Clipping your dog’s nails is something that has to be done, but it can be a scary, dangerous job, and you can’t risk cutting it too close. A nervous owner can make for a nervous dog, and a dog that won’t sit still to have their nails clipped can increase their risk of injury.

Getting proper dog nail clippers makes it a much easier job to do.

Here’s what you should know about cutting your dog’s nails and getting the right dog nail clippers for the job.

Cutting Nails: What You Should Know

There’s very good reason why you can’t cut your dog’s nails with a human nail clipper: dogs have very fine arteries that run through their paws and into the nails, and if you aren’t careful, you could end up cutting into one of these arteries (also known as the “quick”) – and yes, the bleeding can be dangerous and warrant a visit to the vet if it is severe enough.

Using a proper dog nail clipper cuts down on the possibility of this happening at all, because they’re designed to cut only the dog’s nails and nothing else. Dog nail clippers are made with your dog’s comfort and safety in mind, and no dog owner should be without their nail clipper.

Learn how to identify where the quick ends in your dog’s nails, and make sure to only trim the very tips of your dog’s nails to avoid cutting into the quick.

The Advantage of Using Nail Cutters

Dog nail cutters make the job of trimming your dog’s nails a lot easier. This is something that has to be done once every few weeks, and it’s normal for owners to have no idea how to do it – but with proper dog nail clippers, there’s a space for the nail to fit through, there’s a proper grip for the owner, and there’s a hugely reduced possibility of accidentally nicking your dog’s paw. While going to the vet or a groomer to have your dog’s nails trimmed is also a good option, owning your own dog nail clippers (and learning how to use them properly) is an excellent way to save time and money.

Nail-Cutting Don’ts

When cutting your dog’s nails, it’s important that you stay as calm as possible while you do it. Don’t make it seem like a “big scary thing,” but instead something exciting. Treats can go along with the experience to make it easier.

There are, of course, some dogs who will downright refuse to sit down for this and might even start growling at their owners – usually, they’ve had a traumatic experience with nail clippers before this, and tend to associate the two. Again, treats can help calm the dog down.

If not, wrap them in a blanket the same way you would a baby and ensure that you have access to their paws while they can’t reach to bite – not too loose and not too tight of a wrap. Of course, follow up with treats and eventually they’ll associate the dog nail clippers with a good experience instead. And if you simply are not comfortable cutting your dog’s nails on your own, contact your veterinarian or a groomer so that they can do this.

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To find the best dog nail clippers, select to begin by breed or by size